ODP

Droning On

How Drone Delivery Can Save Lives

By | Drone Delivery, Public Relations | No Comments

drone delivery saves livesWhen people think of drones they think one of three things: 1. military spy drone 2. ‘annoying’ hobbyists or 3. the future of delivery. Typically there is a negative connotation to any of these viewpoints, but whenever new technology hits the public, it’s always scary at first until it becomes the new norm. There will be those scary outliers, but for the most part drones are nothing to be afraid of.

Huge retailers are adopting this new drone technology and are trying to figure out ways to capitalize on the features drones offer businesses of being the best, the first, and the go-to source for fast, quality service. With this the public tends to think that drone delivery will mean having drones constantly overhead at all times threatening privacy. Another threat people tie to drone delivery is that it will threaten traditional delivery and trucking services and cut down precious jobs in our recovering economy.

Despite the abundance of negative drone connotations and impending doom of privacy, the futuristic world of flying drones and cars are still many, many years away. To play devil’s advocate, we need to ask ourselves what good can come from delivery drones. The Journal of the American Medical Association  (JAMA) suggests that drones can save lives by getting cardiac defibrillator equipment to patients more quickly. JAMA suggests that drone delivery can be a valuable tool for increasing positive outcomes for medical cases. Quicker access to medicine and medical devices will statistically save lives.

Disaster response programs will benefit from drone delivery services as well. If roads are shut down due to flooding, mudslides, or debris, drones can be the first responder victims need.  New technology shouldn’t be scary or have a negative connotation to it, it should be exciting and embraced at the positive impact it can have for all of us.

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Landscape Leadership Blog Feature

By | Public Relations, Sales & Marketing | No Comments
Drones for Marketing Your Landscaping Services

Photo Credit: Neave Pools

Oklahoma Drone Photography (ODP) is featured in Landscape Leadership‘s blog explaining why landscape professionals should utilize aerial drone photography for their projects. Landscape Leadership is a sales and marketing agency for lawn and landscape industry companies like landscape contractors, lawn care operators, tree care companies, garden centers and equipment manufacturers. They work with many of the top green industry companies across the country offering a wide range of sales and marketing services including website design and development, content marketing (writing, photography and video production), search engine optimization (SEO) and social media.

ODP’s first client was Galt Landscape, LLC. based out of Tuttle, Oklahoma. ODP captured  incredible backyard oasis’ that the owner Galt designed in the Oklahoma City metro area and saw an opening to provide a service for the landscape industry that had not been available up until a few years ago. Being featured in Landscape Leadership’s blog cemented the fact that drones are a powerful tool for sales and marketing not only for the landscape industry, but for any company that needs a different vantage point to showcase their events and services.

Throughout the blog ODP, along with two other industry professionals based in California and Illinois, explain utilizing drones for landscaping photography is a game changer when it comes to  sales and marketing approaches. Drones are a new tool for all industries to use to keep businesses at the top of their game.

To read Landscape Leadership’s blog in its entirety, please click here.

Flying Drones in Cold Temperatures

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Living and working in Oklahoma, we are subject to colder temperatures, but as the weather gets colder, the drone is not affected. Safety is Oklahoma Drone Photography’s (ODP’s) number one concern, winds are the biggest issue for drone pilots, not temperatures.  Many people may think that drones cannot fly when the temperatures plummet, but cold temperatures do not affect the overall performance of the Phantom drone, and in some cases enhance it. We take precautions to flying in colder temperatures to ensure quality photos and video are still captured, and to ensure the safety of the aircraft and the subjects below.

5 Effects of Cold Temperatures on a Drone:

Icing on the Props

Oklahoma winters are colder and can be either a dry or humid state depending on if the air comes from the north or south. If we’re dealing with a wet/cold (i.e. more humid) week, then we watch out for icing. When cool air passes over a warm surface, fog will form, so we make sure to never fly when we can’t see the drone.

Moisture in the Gimbal

This is a concern any time of year, but with snow, ice, and melt (and slush from salted roads), it’s even more of a concern in winter. We do not pilot the drone if any precipitation is falling from the sky. Not only is it dangerous, but the gimbal and our camera lens will be saturated in water which creates blurry images and videos. If there is snow on the ground, we can hand launch or launch from a plastic sheet or on top of our carrying case to cut down on elemental exposure.

Battery Life is Shorter

We currently have multiple batteries for our drone. Normally a battery will last for 20 minutes of flying time, but in cold temperatures, we get even less time. We make sure to keep bring all batteries on our photo shoots. While one is in use, the others are charging in a warm vehicle to ensure unlimited flight time.

Cold Fingers

We’ve all been exposed to cold temperatures and don’t need to be told how to keep our hands warm. Having said that, we fly by technology. Our Pilot’s hands and fingers are exposed to the elements each time he steps foot onto a property. Since eyes have to be on the drone at all times, there is not flying from inside a warm car or building. So, when temperatures are really bad there are flying gloves we use with thermal insulation and TouchTec technology.

Higher Air Density

As air becomes cooler, it also becomes more dense. This is actually a positive attribute to cold weather for flight. Propellers, wings, and rotors cut through and use the air to support an aircraft, and when it is more dense, there is more control, lift, and better flight all around.

 

Outlook Magazine Feature, OKC Aerial Photographers, Drone Family OKC

Outlook Magazine Feature

By | Keep It Local OK, Photography, Public Relations, Uncategorized | No Comments

Outlook Magazine Feature

Oklahoma Drone Photography has been featured in Outlook Magazine, a direct-mail feature that has a heart and focuses on local stories. Distributed in Edmond and North OKC, Outlook is the largest regional magazine, covering 50,000 homes. “Since 2005, we’ve published hundreds of stories about local people, places and events – stories of heroism, compassion, generosity and just plain quirkiness”, says the paper.

Aerial Drone Photographers, Oklahoma Aerial Photographers, OKC Aerial Photography, Outlook Magazine, OKC Outlook Magazine, OKC MagazineODP recently met up with reporter Austin Marshall to discuss the history of drones and how the profession has blossomed into the commercial and residential landscape the past few years. The growing popularity of drones has created a great divide between the recreational hobbyist and professionals operating drones as businesses. Marshall made sure to ask about FAA regulations, UAV pilot licenses, and insurance practices that legitimate drone professionals use while operating their business.

ODP explains throughout the article that a company is going to get what they pay for when hiring a drone operator to capture their commercial businesses. There is so much more that goes into flying a drone and capturing a stellar photograph than what the general public sees.

To read about the highs and lows of operating a drone photography business in Oklahoma, please click here to view the full article.